Don Tapscott: Four principles for the open world



The recent generations have been bathed in connecting technology from birth, says futurist Don Tapscott, and as a result the world is transforming into one that is far more open and transparent. In this inspiring talk, he lists the four core principles that show how this open world can be a far better place.

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48 thoughts on “Don Tapscott: Four principles for the open world

  1. Brilliant content – intelligent, mature and developed. Just wanting to know the name of the piece of music played over the starlings?

  2. The dumbest generation ,disconnected from nature  and addicted to digital affirmation .There awful taste in music ie. auto tune sums it all up.

  3. Too bad he emphasized on the incentive that "being virtuous brings more money". Here's some attempt at wisdom: money is raw power, equivalent to the power of a politician. With a lot of money you can influence the world, by using it to accelerate the development of the areas you are interested in. Now who gets big amounts of money? Do we elect them? Are they the wisest people on Earth? Well, really wise people don't seek, nor are given the money. We are governed by the greedy. I hope it ends someday.

  4. Very lucid and well-considered principles. Of course, these are ideals with a moral application. Datamiam is correct in saying that money equals power, but Tapscott is also correct in saying that virtuous behavior brings wealth. They are two sides of the same concept. Both of you are making essentially the same observation with different moral conclusions.Hmm, reminds me of the Malthus debate. To me, these are all observable results of known quantities. Science rules!

  5. I remixed a remixed. it was this joke! ;] It's all been done before. Even Disney stole all their first stories.

  6. I almost lost this video, but luckily I found it back. This video really gets me hopeful and excited for the future.

  7. Thank you. I have a a friend who lives in Göteborg with his family. He is an engineer in Ericsson, while his wife is a dentist and they live very happy life. One of the things that talks in favour of Sweden is the fact that you are very nice to your immigrants.

    In order to avoid the impression that I'm kissing your butt, I must tell you that you have an absolutely awful weather 😉

  8. Than, you are the lucky one as far as the nationality is concerned. I am a Croatian, which is better than if I were e.g. from Uganda, but my country suffers of all transitional illnesses one can imagine.

    My choices were either to go to Sweden and have a decent life, but to be a foreigner my whole life, far from my family and old friends – or I could have stayed here and try to change my country, even though the local mindset is not in my favour. I chose the second… we'll see how it goes 🙂

  9. I'm talking about the general or average mindset of the population. In each society there are better and worse examples, of course…

    People in Finland live very modestly. Even though they are very rich society (comparing to vast majority of countries in the World) they do not drive expensive cars, do not build big or fancy houses, they do not like any kind of pushy or flashy behaviour… Instead they invest in future and education. Japan and Sweden have the similar culture….

  10. Nice. if all people in the World were like the ones from Sweden, Finland or Japan, this even might have worked.

  11. sharing, collaboration, openness — are you freaking kidding me? that doesn't work in this economic system.

  12. Too bad birds aren't evil and people are. People will always be both. To act like collective movements only have a society's best interest in mind is also naive. People are easily recruited for destructive causes. Rhetoric, misinformation, and the ongoing existential crisis of living in a world with so much information and no sure truth allows for this. We think we can be objective, but we also know we can never be.

  13. […] Other than that, superb speech! Core wisdom served in a very intelligible way with a natural tone, humour and a great final that infuses hope.

  14. Too bad he emphasized on the incentive that "being virtuous brings more money".
    Here's some wisdom for you: money is raw power, equivalent to the power of a politician. With a lot of money you can influence the world, by using it to accelerate the development of the areas you are interested in. Now who gets big amounts of money? Do we elect them? Are they the wisest people on Earth? No, really wise people don't seek, nor are given the money. We are governed by the greedy. I hope it ends someday.

  15. In case I've lost you…philosophy, religion and discipline are much less interesting when you're a kid than the vast labrinth of free knowledge, but these are the disciplines that grant you freedom.

    My generation (I'm 30) suffered from the lack of discipline, and I still suffer in many areas of my life because of this, while my parents didn't have to. Will my kids suffer from the lack of guiding principles, morals and structured general knowledge?

  16. So much knowledge without a proper guideline for the use of it. Knowledge is a lot like a toy, you can play with it and you feel as if you're happy, but in the end you're left with very little except maybe better motor coordination. The internet is great when the person using it has the proper structure in place to make use of it, otherwise, it leads to variants that are lost.

  17. well Pseudonyms and privacy settings ain't gonna help anyone. If someone even gets a chance of seeing your e-mail adress they can easily get all information about you. Suddenly they can see what you do online check your e-mail check out your friends and check out where you live your ip which school your kids go to and how much you earn and much more. How do I know, well I'm friends with hackers computer engineers and similar proffessions. It's not rocket science, it's computer science.

  18. The dictatorships in the Middle East must be reformed – but the "revolutions" described by Mr. Tapscott were not of the people, by the people, and thus not indicative of the paradigm shift he has otherwise correctly encapsulated in his talk. The "Arab Spring" is the Western elite harnessing "social media" to eliminate rivals and consolidate power and represent the entrenched elite hijacking what is otherwise a profound social and technological paradigm shift.

  19. Mr. Tapscott makes a lot of valid points-but his talk jumps the track when he gets to the Arab Spring-while the potential for what he described exists-in reality the "Arab Spring" was meticulously premeditated, planned, & executed by the very elitist powers he describes as "endangered." Just like other revolutions Mr. Tapscott covered, the entrenched elite never give up wi/out a fight – this isn't about petty dictators in the ME – its about corporate financier elitism on Wall St. & in London.

  20. My personal tastes are irrelevant, what i wish to draw attention to is the cultural heritage which should be familiar to all. I am alarmed that someone is ignorant to it and recognises it only as "those violins, which are a bit too much".

    I imagine soon i'll be hearing Ballet described as "those jumpy people, whom are rather distracting".

  21. No, I'm more curious to explore an application of Pachelbel's Canon that OP would ever find acceptable. As i suspect "those violins" are probably "a bit much" for him in ALL circumstances.

  22. I'm sorry, it was Cypherpunks, not cryptopunks. Here you have the link, it's very interesting:

    /watch?v=eil_1j72LOA

    And another video showing the CIA's opinion about Facebook:

    /watch?v=3sThcwmx3rs

    Mark Zuckerberg received a prize from the CIA!! LOL

  23. Brilliant. We are seeing the beginning of real change in the world. It's nice to have people who can lay it out, so that its easy for everyone to understand. I am excited for my son and his future.

  24. You can easily be tracked by more complex means =P For example, every time you post something or log in into an account, you leave a track about your location and IP. Trust me, no normal internet user is safe of Big Brother. CIA has more information about you than your parents or friends. They can relate your mail account to your bank account, they have face recognition software for photos… don't forget the info about credit cards. Take a look to the Cryptopunks interview with Julian Assange.

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